By the beginning of the 20th century the social fabric of Japan was radically altered and ukiyo-e was fast falling into oblivion. Surprisingly, it was under the stimulus of the Western art that ukiyo-e was reborn as shin hanga or “new prints.” The discovery of the powerful impact of ukiyo-e masters on the Impressionists and Post-Impressionists inspired a new generation of Japanese print artists who revived distinctly Japanese subject matter through modern eyes. International excitement for ukiyo-e paved the way for these artists to create woodblock prints with the same dignity, perfection and genius as the masters of the Edo period. As artists such as Goyo, Kotondo and Shinsui revived bijin-ga (pictures of beautiful women) and Hasui and Yoshida reinterpreted the landscape of Japan, shin hanga reasserted the principal genres of ukiyo-e with a renewed vigor. 

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