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Ronin Gallery Blog

Q+A With Roni Neuer, Ronin Gallery Founder

Published by: Madison Folks, 10/2/2020 6:27 am

As we launch our latest online exhibition Founder's Favorites, we took a moment to speak with Roni Neuer, Ronin Gallery founder and executive director, about her selected works, lifetime of collecting, and advice for new collectors.

Looking Back: Four Years of the Ronin|Globus Artist-in-Residence Program

Published by: Madison Folks, 10/2/2020 5:56 am

Hosted jointly by Ronin Gallery and Globus Washitsu, Ronin|Globus Artist-in-Residence seeks to stimulate cross-cultural dialogue by providing the opportunity for Japanese visual artists to live, work and exhibit in New York City.

Hanami at Home

Published by: Madison Folks, 9/16/2020 6:29 pm

While a light chill may still hang in the air, the first blooms of delicate pink petals ensure us that spring has indeed arrived.

A Closer Look: Moon of the Lonely House

Published by: Madison Folks, 9/16/2020 5:07 pm

From vengeful ghosts to mythical creatures, Japanese folklore teems with spine-chilling tales of the supernatural.

What are Kuchi-e?

Published by: Madison Folks, 9/15/2020 1:47 pm

Brimming with wistful beauties and romantic allusions, kuchi-e, literally translated to “mouth pictures” or “opening pictures,” served as frontispiece illustrations for popular novels and literary magazines from the 1890s through the 1910s.

Tsukimi and the Harvest Moon

Published by: Madison Folks, 9/15/2020 1:32 pm

The Harvest Moon is the full moon closest to the autumn equinox, which generally occurs in the third week of September.

Featured Artist: Daryl Howard

Published by: Madison Folks, 9/15/2020 1:14 pm

Ronin Gallery is thrilled to have our very own Daryl Howard featured in the March issue of Southwest Art!

An Artist and His City: Urban Greenspace

Published by: Madison Folks, 9/14/2020 4:22 pm

While the second installment in this series took us within an intimate interior of the Yoshiwara, this week we’ll step outside into one of Edo’s urban greenspaces through Moon Pine, Ueno.

An Artist and His City: Unseen Individuals

Published by: Madison Folks, 9/14/2020 3:57 pm

Now that we have our bearings in Edo, the second installment of this series takes us to a view of Asakusa Ricefields in the midst of the Torinomachi Festival.

An Artist and His City: Getting Our Bearings

Published by: Madison Folks, 9/14/2020 3:30 pm

An Artist and His City invites you to explore Japan’s feudal capital through the eyes of an edokko.

What is Kawaii?

Published by: Madison Folks, 9/13/2020 4:45 am

While often translated to “cute,” in English, this translation is a misnomer. Masuda’s definition of kawaii is distinct from that which rose in the commercial kawaii of the 1980s. Instead, his definition focuses on a spirit of kawaii, continuing a powerful narrative of Japanese pop culture that bloomed during the Edo Period.

Shinrin-yoku: What is Forest Bathing?

Published by: Madison Folks, 9/13/2020 4:34 am

Shinrin-yoku, or "forest bathing," was created in Japan in the 1980s as a meditative and restorative interaction with nature.

Ronin Gallery at the Morikami Museum

Published by: Madison Folks, 9/13/2020 4:23 am

Ronin Gallery is proud to have collaborated with the Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens on their exhibition, Perseverance: Japanese Tattoo Tradition in a Modern World.

Horiyoshi III on Vice

Published by: Ronin Gallery, 9/13/2020 4:03 am

After our exhibition Taboo: Ukiyo-e and the Japanese Tattoo earlier this year, we at Ronin Gallery are thrilled to see Japan's foremost tattoo artist, Horiyoshi III, featured on VICE.

Spring Showers

Published by: Madison Folks, 9/12/2020 5:08 am

Rainy days envelop the senses, from sparkling reflections in the puddles and the steady drum of rain out the window, to the crisp smell of the air just before a storm and the sensation of cool mist against skin.

Focus On: Hiroshige's Kinryuzan Temple at Asakusa

Published by: Madison Folks, 9/11/2020 12:40 pm

Quiet beneath a blanket of snow, the Kinryuzan Temple rests at the end of the lane. The townspeople of Asakusa brave the cold, bundled up and huddled beneath umbrellas, as they approach the temple.

Advancements in Japanese Photography from the Edo Period

Published by: Archive, 9/10/2020 3:39 pm

The first introduction of photography to Japan started during the Edo period when Dutch merchants inhabited Nagasaki Bay.

Van Gogh & Hiroshige's Unspoken Collaboration

Published by: Travis T Suzaka, 9/10/2020 1:53 pm

In Van Gogh’s (1853-1890) The Bridge in the Rain 1887 (after Hiroshige’s Ohashi Bridge) we are given a unique look inside the mind of one of the world’s great artistic geniuses.

Ink, Banditry and Bushido: Otokodate (Part 2)

Published by: Madison Folks, 9/10/2020 12:58 pm

Adapted from the 14th century Chinese classic, Shuihuzhuan (Stories of the Water Margin), the Suikoden resounded with Edo’s emergent middle class.

Transposing Genji: From Prince to Playboy

Published by: Madison Folks, 9/9/2020 5:31 pm

Written by Lady Murasaki Shikibu in the 11th century, Genji Monogatari (The Tale of Genji) follows life of Hiraku Genji, son of the Japanese emperor.

A Closer Look: Courtesan Wakaume From the Tamaya

Published by: Madison Folks, 9/9/2020 6:29 am

Kitagawa Utamaro (1753-1806) is a true master of ukiyo-e. From his images of bugs to his renowned portraits of women, his works exude a subtle and elegant beauty.

Unusual Ukiyo-e Formats: Hashira-e & Kakemono

Published by: Madison Folks, 9/9/2020 6:13 am

The hashira-e, or pillar print, is one of the least common print formats in the ukiyo-e tradition.

Meet the Artist: Ushio Shinohara

Published by: Madison Folks, 9/8/2020 5:30 pm

Ushio established himself as the enfant terrible of the Japanese art scene, where he gained particular notoriety for his boxing paintings.

The Pleasures of Love: What Can We Learn from Shunga?

Published by: Madison Folks, 9/8/2020 4:23 pm

Translating directly to “spring pictures,” shunga first appeared in Japan during the Heian period.

Considering Condition: When Can a Negative Become a Positive?

Published by: Madison Folks, 9/8/2020 3:55 pm

How many of the traits that traditionally depreciate a print’s value actually preserved the work’s overall value?

Brushes, Brooms and Talons: Tales of Hokusai

Published by: Madison Folks, 9/8/2020 7:44 am

With the exhibition HOKUSAI: Great Art, Small Sizes, Ronin Gallery took a moment consider the more exuberant moments of this artistic genius.

The Burning Question: How many prints Were made?

Published by: Madison Folks, 9/7/2020 3:40 pm

When discussing Japanese woodblock prints, there is one question sure to follow: How many prints were made? While a simple question, the answer is complex.

Meet the Artist: Noriko Shinohara

Published by: Madison Folks, 9/7/2020 3:12 pm

Born in Toyama Prefecture, Japan in 1953, Noriko Shinohara moved to New York City in 1972 to study at the Art Students League.

Japonisme: The Great Wave

Published by: Madison Folks, 9/7/2020 5:54 am

The 1867 Paris Exposition Universelle exposed many Europeans to Japan for the first time.

Haunted at Sea: The Tale of Yoshitsune and the Taira Ghosts

Published by: Madison Folks, 9/7/2020 5:41 am

Japanese myths brim with ghosts and demons, animals with magical powers, mischievous spirits, and mysterious realms where humans and supernatural creatures live side by side.

Yoshitoshi's Masterpiece: The Flute Player

Published by: Madison Folks, 9/7/2020 5:28 am

Fujiwara no Yasumasa (958-1036) was a renowned musician and poet in the Heian court.

A World Between - The Life of Yoshitoshi (1839-1892)

Published by: Madison Folks, 9/4/2020 8:43 am

Regarded as the last of the great masters of ukiyo-e, Yoshitoshi worked during this era of dramatic cultural and economic transformation.

The Fierce and Fantastic World of Kuniyoshi

Published by: Madison Folks, 9/3/2020 11:43 am

As his fellow masters capture the physical realms of Edo’s floating world, Kuniyoshi presents a phantasmagoria of the fierce, frightening, and the fantastic.

A Closer Look: Moon Above the Sea at Daimotsu Bay

Published by: Madison Folks, 9/3/2020 11:22 am

This week, we'll turn our attention to Yoshitoshi's "Moon Above the Sea at Daimotsu Bay" (1886) from the famed series The One Hundred Views of the Moon.

Ink, Banditry, and Bushido: Introduction and the Hikeshi (Part 1)

Published by: Madison Folks, 9/3/2020 11:11 am

By the dawn of the Edo period, the role of the samurai had shifted. As Japan experienced a period of relative calm, these fierce fighters found themselves bored and brimming with pent up aggression.

What is Kappazuri?

Published by: Ronin Gallery, 9/2/2020 8:17 am

In honor of our very special Yoshitoshi Mori (1898–1992) exhibition, this week we’d like to focus on kappazuri, an innovative stencil printing technique that straddles the boundary of art and traditional craft.

Collecting and Connoisseurship: The Art of Collecting

Published by: Madison Folks, 9/2/2020 5:16 am

In order to curate a stunning collection of Japanese art, one must know how to properly evaluate a print.

Shin Hanga & Hasui Kawase

Published by: Mei Bock, 9/2/2020 4:55 am

<em>Shin hanga</em> was a Japanese woodblock print movement that took place at the beginning of the twentieth century.

Shunga: A Titillating Treasure

Published by: Madison Folks, 9/2/2020 4:40 am

Shunga, or “spring pictures,” capture a vast spectrum of sensual pleasures. From the passionate reunions of great lovers, to the excitement of clandestine affairs, these erotic prints satisfy a wide range of sexual appetites.

What Makes a Print Rare?

Published by: Madison Folks, 9/2/2020 4:21 am

From the Edo period to today, artists produce woodblock prints in multiples. While surimono (lavishly printed, privately commissioned works) could be commissioned in editions as small as a single print, the most popular designs were printed into the hundreds during the Edo period.

A Closer Look: The Tale of the 47 Ronin

Published by: Madison Folks, 8/31/2020 6:09 pm

The celebrated tale of the 47 loyal retainers stems from the historical event known as the Ako incident (1701-1704).

A Closer Look: Hokusai's Great Wave

Published by: Madison Folks, 8/31/2020 5:38 pm

No single work of Japanese art is better known than Katsushika Hokusai’s (1760-1849) Under the Wave off Kanagawa, or, as it is widely known, the Great Wave.

The Rise of Japanese Post-War Photography

Published by: Madison Folks, 8/29/2020 4:54 am

Over the past decade, the influence of Japanese photography has swept the art market. At auction, early works continue to set record prices, while many museums are avidly developing and exhibiting their collections of Japanese photography.

Musha-e: The Warriors of Ukiyo-e

Published by: Madison Folks, 8/28/2020 5:59 am

From fierce samurai to legendary heroes, musha-e (武者絵) celebrate the traditional Japanese warrior.

How to Make a Woodblock Print

Published by: Madison Folks, 8/28/2020 5:07 am

A Japanese woodblock print is said to be the work of the artist, but in truth it is the joint effort of the ‘ukiyo-e quartet’—the artist, engraver, printer and publisher.

A Closer Look: Jade Rabbit and Sun Wukong

Published by: Madison Folks, 8/20/2020 7:12 pm

Songoku, the Monkey King, or Sun Wukong in Chinese, is the hero of the 16th century Chinese novel The Journey to the West.

Imagining Japan: Early Japanese Photography

Published by: Madison Folks, 8/20/2020 6:46 pm

The history of photography in Japan begins during the Edo period. Introduced through the Dutch merchants that inhabited Dejima Island in Nagasaki Bay, the medium attracted an initially small, but intrigued audience. 

What is Sosaku Hanga?

Published by: Madison Folks, 8/20/2020 6:32 pm

In the early 20th century, two distinct modern Japanese print movements emerged. Shin Hanga, or "new print," movement drew inspiration from French Impressionist techniques, employed growing realism, and reimagined popular ukiyo-e subject matter through a modern lens.

The Tale of the Nine-Tailed Fox

Published by: Madison Folks, 8/12/2020 3:33 pm

Popular characters in Japanese myths and folklore, foxes, or kitsune, are considered intelligent, magical and associated with the Shinto spirit Inari.

Decoding Ukiyo-e: Standard Sizes

Published by: Madison Folks, 8/11/2020 11:43 am

While ukiyo-e were printed in a variety of sizes, each format adhered to a standardized sizing system shaped by both technical and social factors. This determination begins with two of the primary materials of woodblock printing: the woodblock and the paper. 

A Closer Look: The Yugao Chapter from The Tale of Genji

Published by: Madison Folks, 7/31/2020 2:23 pm

The Yugao Chapter from The Tale of Genji (1886), is inspired by a foundational work of Japanese literature. Written by Lady Murasaki Shikibu in the 11th century, Genji Monogatari (The Tale of Genji) follows life of Hiraku Genji, the shining son of the Japanese emperor.