Featured Articles

A Closer Look: Yorimasa and the Nue

From vengeful spirits to mischievous monsters, ukiyo-e teem with supernatural beings and spine-chilling tales. With Halloween upon us, we turn to one such tale–the story of Yorimasa and the nue–as told by two masters of the fearsome and fantastic, Kuniyoshi and Yoshitoshi. The nue is a chimeral monster with the head of a monkey, the body of a badger (or tanuki), the legs of a tiger, and a hissing snake as a tail, depending on the source.

Read More

Katsukawa: Early Masters of Kabuki Portraiture

Ronin Gallery invites you to step into the theatrical world of 18th-century kabuki. Katsukawa: Early Masters of Kabuki Portraiture presents the brightest stars of the kabuki stage through the eyes of the artists of the Katsukawa School. Named for its founder, Shunsho Katsukawa, this artistic lineage redefined the field of actor prints (yakusha-e) in the late 18th century.

Read More

Q+A with Sarah Brayer

Sarah Brayer is an internationally acclaimed artist who works in print and paper mediums. This May, we took a moment to catch up with her about her recent solo exhibition Inner Light at Kyoto’s Komyo-in Temple, her Luminosity series, and her latest book project.

Read More

Spirit of the Stage: The Theatrical Prints of Kokei Tsuruya

In Spirit of the Stage: Kokei Tsuruya, we explore the career and artistic process of the woodblock print artist and modern master of actor portraiture, Kokei Tsuruya.

Read More
More Articles

Celebrating Our Earth

Earth Day is an annual global event observed on April 22, a day to reflect upon our planet's magnificence and to commit to doing our part to protect the environment.

Read More

Featured Artist: Daryl Howard

Daryl Howard embodies the beauty of cross-cultural art. She artfully combines influences from her American upbringing in Texas with traditional woodblock printing techniques learned in Japan.

Read More

Focus On: Hiroshige's Kinryuzan Temple at Asakusa

Quiet beneath a blanket of snow, Kinryuzan Temple rests at the end of the lane. The townspeople of Asakusa brave the cold, bundled up and huddled beneath umbrellas as they approach the temple.

Read More

Understanding Ukiyo-e Formats: Hashira-e & Kakemono

With their unusually long and narrow dimensions, the hashira-e and kakemono formats created compositional challenges, yet also immense potential in an artist's approach to the image. The format itself was freeing and unique, allowing for compositions that brimmed with the grace and emotion of artfully employed negative space and vertical dynamism.

Read More

Hashira-e: 18th Century Pillar Prints

The second half of the 18th century was the golden age of innovation in ukiyo-e. During this period, woodblock print artists experimented with a variety new techniques and sizes. In Hashira-e: 18th Century Pillar Prints, Ronin Gallery considers the enormous versatility and groundbreaking innovation of the artists working in the hashira-e format during the golden age.

Read More

Kacho-e: Masterpieces of Birds, Flowers, and Insects

The specific tradition of kacho-e, which is most simply the depiction of flora and fauna, has a long visual and literary history. Imbued with metaphorical significance beyond their physical beauty, specific pairings of birds, flowers, and insects have formed the basis for a tradition that extends into the contemporary moment.

Read More

Hashiguchi Goyo: Prints, Paintings & Drawings

Hashiguchi Goyo is a critically important Japanese artist of the early 20th century. This rare retrospective of Goyo's work provides a unique opportunity to gain insight into the process and progression of a modern genius.

Read More

Advancements in Japanese Photography from the Edo Period

Photography first arrived in Japan during the Edo period when Dutch merchants inhabited Nagasaki Bay. Many early Japanese photographers went to study in Nagasaki and in 1854 Kawamoto Komin published Ensei-Kikijutsu, the first book in Japanese about photographic techniques.

Read More

Van Gogh & Hiroshige's Unspoken Collaboration

In Van Gogh's 1887 painting The Bridge in the Rain (after Hiroshige's Ohashi Bridge) we are given a unique look inside the mind of one of the world's great artistic geniuses. By viewing this painting that is both uniquely his and also one of the most outwardly influenced works in his portfolio (he literally copied verbatim, although his own vehement style, from a Hiroshige woodblock print), we are let into the mind of Vincent the artist as well as Vincent the man.

Read More
Read More Articles